Thursday, May 5, 2016

Wedding Rings

Today we found out the history and symbolism behind the tradition of wearing a wedding ring and why, in most western cultures, it’s worn on the fourth finger of the left hand, otherwise known as the ring finger.
Wedding rings today are a billion dollar sentiment of love, but no  one can really say for sure when this age old tradition actually started. Some believe that the oldest recorded exchange of wedding rings comes from ancient Egypt, about 4800 years ago. Sedges, rushes and reeds, growing alongside the well-known papyrus were twisted and braided into rings for fingers an other decorative ornaments worn by the women in those days.
The circle was the symbol of eternity, with no beginning or end, not only to the Egyptians, but many other ancient cultures. The hole in the center of the ring also had significance. It wasn’t just considered a space, but rather a gateway, or door; leading to things and events both known and unknown. To give a woman a ring signifies never-ending and immortal love.
The materials these rings were made of didn’t last very long and soon were substituted with rings made of leather, bone or ivory. The more expensive the material, the more love shown to the receiver; the value of the ring also  demonstrated the wealth of the giver.
The Roman’s also eventually adopted this tradition but with their own twist. Rather than offering a ring to a woman as a symbol of love, they awarded them as a symbol of ownership. Roman men would “claim” their woman with the giving of a ring. Roman betrothal rings were later made of iron and called “Anulus Pronubus.” They symbolized strength and permanence. It is also said that the Romans were the first to engrave their rings.
It was not until about 860 that the Christians used the ring in marriage ceremonies; even then, it was not the simple plain band as we know it. It usually was highly decorated with engraved doves, lyres, or two linked hands. The Church discouraged such rings as ‘heathenish’ and, around the 13th century, wedding and betrothal rings were considerably simplified, and given a more spiritual look which was very aptly expressed by a Bishop when he dubbed it a “symbol of the union of hearts.”
Wedding rings through different stages in history have been worn on different fingers, including the thumb, and on both the left and right hands. According to  a tradition believed to have been derived from the Romans, the wedding ring is worn on the left hand ring finger because there was thought to be a vein in the finger, referred to as the ‘Vena Amoris’ or the ‘Vein of Love’ said to be directly connected to the heart. However, scientists have shown this is actually false. Despite this, this  myth still remains regarded by many (hopeless romantics) as the number one reason rings are worn on the fourth finger.
Another theory thought to be behind the ring being placed on the left hand by Christians seems a little more plausible. Early Christian marriages had a ritual to wear the wedding ring in the third finger. As the priest recited during the binding ,”In the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit”, he would take the ring and touch the thumb, the index finger, and the middle finger; then, while uttering “Amen”, he would place the ring on the ring finger, which sealed the marriage.
A more practically based theory is that the soft metal (traditionally gold for wedding rings) is less worn or injured on the finger of the left hand, due to most of the world being right handed.  Further, the fourth finger on the left hand is probably the second to the least used finger on a person’s hands outside of pinkies.  Pinkies being small, making a small ring with little surface area to decorate, perhaps motivated people to then place it on the next least used finger, namely the fourth finger on the left hand, which is roughly the size of the other fingers.
Bonus Facts:

  • The earliest and smallest engagement ring was given to Princess Mary, daughter of Henry VIII. She was two years old at the time.  Presumably the ring was given to her by Pedobear. 😉
  • Seventeen tons of gold are made into wedding rings each year in the United States!
  • Back in the 1300’s, when people were particularly superstitious, it was believed that taking a piece of the bride’s clothing would grant the guests good luck. This lead to many guests that would literally tear cloth from the bride’s dress (which made for a very peeved bride!). So, in an attempt to stave off greedy luck-seekers, many brides began to throw items to guests that could be easily removed from her and that included her garter. Eventually, grooms began to remove the garter and tossed it to the men as a means to prevent tipsy male guests from trying to do the deed themselves. In an effort to help the women feel included, it eventually became customary for the bride to throw her bouquet at the female guests.
  • There are dozens of good-luck, bad-luck traditions followed by different cultures around the world. In Greek culture, a sugar cube is tucked into the bride’s glove to “sweeten” the marriage. For good luck, Egyptian women pinch the bride on her wedding day. The English believe a spider found in a wedding dress means good luck.Peas are thrown at Czech newlyweds instead of rice. Ancient Greeks and Romans thought the veil protected the bride from evil spirits. Brides have worn veils ever since. The groom carries the bride across the threshold to bravely protect her from evil spirits lurking below.
  • The first recorded account of a diamond engagement ring was in 1477 when King Maximilian I of Germany (1459-1519) proposed to Mary of Burgundy (1457-1482) and offered her a diamond to seal his vow. (So, men you now know who to blame!)
  • Interestingly, in many countries, even today, including Norway, Russia, Greece, Ukraine, Bulgaria, Poland, Austria, Germany,Portugal and Spain, the wedding ring in worn on the ring finger of the right hand and not the left. In Jewish tradition, the groom places the ring on the bride’s index finger, and not the “ring” finger at all.

Monday, April 25, 2016

Wedding Traditions

Wedding Lore and Traditions
by Elizabeth Olson
A Bride and Groom Standing

"Something borrowed" usually comes from a happily married woman and is thought to lend some of her good fortune and joy to the new bride.
Have you ever wondered why the bride stands to the left of the groom, or why the wedding ring is worn on the third finger of the left hand? The origins and meaning behind some of our most cherished wedding traditions may surprise you. There are, of course, multiple explanations for each piece of wedding lore, and few can be definitively traced back to their roots. Below are some of the more common and popular stories behind these traditions.

Tossing the Bouquet

Tossing the bouquet is a tradition that stems from England. Women used to try to rip pieces of the bride's dress and flowers in order to obtain some of her good luck. To escape from the crowd the bride would toss her bouquet and run away. Today the bouquet is tossed to single women with the belief that whoever catches it will be the next to marry.

Giving Away the Bride

The tradition of the father giving away his daughter has its roots in the days of arranged marriages. Daughters in those times were considered their father's property. It was the father's right to give his child to the groom, usually for a price. Today a father giving away his daughter is a symbol of his blessing of the marriage.

The Wedding Ring

The wedding ring has been worn on the third finger of the left hand since Roman times. The Romans believed that the vein in that finger runs directly to the heart. The wedding ring is a never-ending circle, which symbolizes everlasting love.

The Best Man

In ancient times, men sometimes captured women to make them their brides. A man would take along his strongest and most trusted friend to help him fight resistance from the woman's family. This friend, therefore, was considered the best man among his friends. In Anglo-Saxon England, the best man accompanied the groom up the aisle to help defend the bride.

Bride on Groom's Left

Because grooms in Anglo-Saxon England often had to defend their brides, the bride would stand to the left of her groom so that his sword arm was free.

Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed, Something Blue, and a Sixpence in Your Shoe

"Something old" represents the bride's link to her family and the past. The bride may choose to wear a piece of family jewelry or her mother or grandmother's wedding gown. "Something new" represents hope for good fortune and success in the future. The bride often chooses the wedding gown to represent the new item. "Something borrowed" usually comes from a happily married woman and is thought to lend some of her good fortune and joy to the new bride. "Something blue" is a symbol of love, fidelity, and purity of the bride. A sixpence in her shoe is to wish the bride wealth in her future life.

The Tiered Wedding Cake

The origin of the tiered wedding cake also lies in Anglo-Saxon times. Guests would bring small cakes to the wedding and stack them on top of each other. Later, a clever French baker created a cake in the shape of the small cakes and covered it in frosting. It is now known as the tiered cake.
A Wedding Bouquet

Wedding Bouquet

Flowers are incorporated into the wedding ceremony as a symbol of fertility. The first bouquets consisted of herbs and, later, orange blossoms.

The Bridal Veil

The bridal veil has long been a symbol of youth, modesty, and virginity and was used to ward off evil.

Bridesmaids


The bridal party is a tradition that has been established for many centuries. For a long time the purpose of the bridal party was to fool evil spirits. The bride's friends dressed similarly to her in order to confuse any virulent presences that might be lurking about. Today bridesmaids are there to support the bride in the stressful times during the wedding.

Monday, April 11, 2016

Wedding Traditions

English customs

A wedding carriage in Bristol,England
The Western custom of a bride wearing a white wedding dress came to symbolize purity, not virginity, in the Victorian era. Within the "white wedding" tradition, a white dress and veil is not considered appropriate in the second or subsequent wedding of a widow or divorcee. The specific conventions of Western weddings, largely from a Protestant and Catholic viewpoint, are discussed at "white wedding".
A wedding is often followed or accompanied by a wedding reception, which in some areas may be known as the 'Wedding Breakfast', at which an elaborate wedding cake is served. Western traditions include toasting the couple, the newlyweds having the first dance, and cutting the cake. A bride may throw her bouquet to the assembled group of all unmarried women in attendance, with folklore suggesting the person who catches it will be the next to wed. A fairly recent equivalent has the groom throwing the bride's garter to the assembled unmarried men; the man who catches it is supposedly the next to wed.
The Wedding Breakfast is one occasion where every member of the family who has had at least some role in the wedding is present. It is also important as the first time the newly married bride and groom share their first meal together as a lawfully wedded couple. The word Breakfast comes from a more ancient tradition of fasting before the wedding ceremony, the Wedding Breakfast is therefore 'breaking that fast'. The modern Wedding Breakfast includes the service of food to guests that can range from traditional roasts, buffets, or regional treats such as in the case of a London Wedding[1] in the 'East End'.
Another Victorian tradition is for brides to wear or carry "something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue" during the service. It is considered good luck to do so. Often the bride attempts to have one item that meets all of these qualifications, such as a borrowed blue handkerchief which is "new to her" but loaned by her grandmother (thus making it old). Another addition to this custom is to wear a coin in one's shoe to bring prosperity.
The full text of the verse is:

Something old, something new,
Something borrowed, something blue,
And silver sixpence in your shoe.[2]

Thursday, April 7, 2016

THE LONDON BRIDAL SHOW: A BRILLIANT EVENT




This year’s London Bridal Show at Olympia saw a big turnout of retailers from across the UK as well as those who travelled from far further afield; it was an event that signposts optimism within the industry


When it comes to indicating the health and well being of a marketplace, attendance at major trade events says a lot and visitor numbers at this year’s London Bridal Show at Olympia suggest that the bridal industry is in great shape right now. The event registered a 10% increase in visitors year on year, with international buyers accounting for 25% of the total, the increase coming most notably from France and Southern Ireland. Retailers were in shopping mode and keen to see the newest collections from some of the big names in the business, while spending time looking at what new and upcoming design houses had to offer.

Said Mark Lesley, showing his eponymous labels as well as his designer bridal collection and occasionwear label Candy Quinn: “It was brilliant. Mark Lesley did wonderfully in terms of increased sales and new customers but Donna Salado was simply outstanding.”

Vikki McCarthy-Wright of Mooshki fame, used this exhibition to launch the stunning new Grace Philips collection agreed. “I cannot believe the reception this new collection has had. It was awesome.”

Europe’s first buying event of the season gave out a clear signal that glamour dressing leads the way, with daringly low backs, mermaid dresses with swishy tails, body-hugging silhouettes, and lace motifs on nude tulle creating a tattoo effect on the skin. Brides who always harboured that dream of being a fairy tale princess on their big day, will almost certainly fall in love with the astonishing array of ballgowns that the key designers are showing for the 2016/2017 season – sumptuous dresses with whittled-down waists and voluminous skirts, some made of layer upon layer of tulle, organza, chiffon and lace, others in simple, elegant fabrics such as Mikado, skilfully sculpted to form the desired fullness.

Alongside the perennial laces there were jewelled and embroidered appliqués introducing a different surface texture, and wonderful jacquards with their own glorious patterning that needed little more than a bead-worked belt to make the right impressions. Long or short – and there were plenty of knee-length and tea-length 50s-style dresses to be seen – it made little difference as long as that message of design confidence and quality make was present and very apparent.

In occasionwear, buyers were wooed and wowed with an amazing rainbow of colours and beautiful fabrics chosen for their drape-appeal, with a fair amount of sparkle to add to the red-carpet experience. Celeb dressing remains key in this sector of the market, where stand out is essential.

One feature of the show was the Monday seminars, run by experts for experts. Retailers attending got to hear first hand about every area of the business and how they could improve their own operation by taking note of what others were doing. Everything from entering awards, to dealing with difficult customers, to closing sales successfully, to working with suppliers was covered and the buyers lapped up the information handed to them.

And of course, a key attraction at The London Bridal Show, as it is at Harrogate in September, is the programme of catwalk performances which saw some breathtakingly fresh collections stepping out and signalling the newest silhouettes for the season ahead. Always playing to a full house, it is this carefully-edited collection of collections that helps retailers pick up on trends early and see first-hand how expert styling introduces the perfect accessories for each look.Bookmark and Share

Children's Fashion



We’re delighted to present Tutu Du Monde Bespoke



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With a choice of eight silhouettes and a selection of beautiful embroidery, beading and embellishments, customers can now personalise a dress, perfect for that special occasion, be it a wedding, family portrait, or birthday celebration. Experience the magic of frills, flounces and feathers, soft hues and gossamer-delicate tulle.  Junior bridesmaids are sure to steal the show in these gorgeous creations that will effortlessly blend in with the outfits of the bridal party, no matter the style or colour.  All Bespoke garments are one-offs, made to order and meticulously hand-crafted, they are unique, timeless treasures designed with vintage appeal.

Tutu du Monde Bespoke – because ‘a thing of beauty is a joy forever’
For enquiries please email bespoke@tutudumonde.com

Sunday, April 3, 2016

Anglo Couture

Vicky Anglo was born and raised in Athens, Greece surrounded by innovation and artistry. Her Father is a sculpture and provided the artistic environment that so naturally led her to follow in his creative footsteps. At the age of 13, Vicky attended a Bridal Fashion Show that sparked her desire to be part of the fashion industry. With a passion for design, a love for the glamour and elegance of weddings, Vicky attended Newbury College in Boston, MA and majored in Fashion Design. After graduation, Vicky gained hands on experience working as a designer for a bridal accessory company and enjoyed every moment. She fell even further in love with both fashion and design and the wedding industry, and decided to follow her dreams to start her own couture line of wedding gowns. For Vicky, the best part of her job is personally working with each bride to create unique, one of a kind wedding gowns with style, personality, and vision. Everyone is different, we all want our personality to shine-especially on our wedding day- so through innovative design and personal collaboration, Vicky works with our brides to ensure they look as great as they feel on their special day. This is her inspiration ans how Anglo Couture was born!

 















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Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Wedding Parties

Reconciling who you want to include in your bridal party with who you're expected, requested, or even told to include can seem like an ordeal. With friends and family anticipating or assuming they'll be asked, it's easy to get confused and resentful. After all, this is supposed to be your day, your way, right? Relax. Choosing your attendants needn't be a nightmare. Prioritizing what's important is the key to arriving at a list that pleases everyone—even you.
bridesmaid dresses

Photo Credit: R.E.M. Video and Photography

Choices, Choices

The most obvious question is how many attendants to ask and who should be your maid/matron of honor. While etiquette books suggest one usher per 50 guests, protocol surrounding the number of bridesmaids is fuzzier (12, however, is the limit). "What's important is that you include those people to whom you feel closest," says Deborah Jones, owner of A Wedding In Minnesota, a bridal consultancy in Eden Prairie, Minnesota. Also consider where you'll be standing at the altar or huppah, and how many people can fit on either side of you. Aesthetically, the same number of attendants on both sides looks best, but there is no rule that says they have to match.
Start by writing your wish list of attendants. Next, add your fiancé's picks, and those who would make political sense(your brother's wife to make him happy, for example). See if there are natural groupings that would make choosing easier: all sisters, all school friends, just one sister and one friend, etc. If your list is still unwieldy, consider the following to help you eliminate people or decide their role.
First, think about their responsibilities. The maid/matron of honor is generally the bride's right-hand woman before and on the day of the wedding. Her main duties include planning the bridal shower and helping the bride select her gown and address invitations. The bridesmaids assist the maid/matron of honor and bride. All typically pay for their own dresses and travel expenses.
Second, evaluate your needs and expectations. Is this a gala affair with many details you'll need help coordinating, or a small, no-fuss ceremony? Are you the type of person who surrounds herself with friends and needs a sounding board for every decision, or do you have only one or two close confidantes?
Do you expect your attendants to devote a significant amount of time and money to your wedding? Would you feel comforted knowing that all of your bridesmaids lived in town, mere minutes away for minor emergencies? If someone says she can't afford to participate, can you make up the difference (and not take it personally)? Be honest with yourself: Are your expectations reasonable? Will you get mad if someone can't help out as much as you'd like due to her work or family commitments?
Third, factor in the lifestyle and current situation of those you intend to ask, and how it meshes or clashes with their responsibilities and your needs. For example, what if your sister lives in Alaska and your best friend just lost her job, or if another friend is so swamped with work or a new baby that she barely squeezes in a phone call, much less time to plan a bridal bash. All these circumstances impact a potential maid's ability to do the best job possible. That said, even if someone can't be there physically, she may still provide valuable moral support. So decide what's most important to you.

Popping the Question

Now the fun part—asking people to be in your party. Some brides try to avoid disappointing anyone by asking people they don't really want to participate, assuming they'll say no because they're too busy or won't be able to afford it. Big mistake: This approach can easily backfire. Some people are so honored to be included that they'll move the world to make it happen. Only ask those you'll be thrilled to hear a "yes" from.
If there's someone you want to ask but are concerned she'll feel pressured by time or money constraints, create a scenario in which each of you would feel comfortable backing out gracefully.  Let her know she's one of your top choices but you understand if she has other commitments that make it difficult for her to take part. If you're willing to cover expenses, ask her how she feels about that. If she knows how important she is to you, she'll probably feel flattered, not insulted.
If you expected a friend to say yes and she doesn't, don't be offended. Chances are it's no reflection on you. Your friend is simply doing you the favour of being upfront and honest about the time and money she wants to devote to your event, an occasion she respects enough not to ruin. 
If someone does accept and later seems unhappy with her decision, try to determine what's really going on. 

Blood Ties

Resolving conflicts with parents and in-laws isn't always so simple. Sometimes an edict is handed-down and that's that. For example, you may be told your sister will be your maid of honour, whether you like it or not. If you have a big enough party, it may not matter—a lot of your friends are included anyway. If you were planning on a small party, consider making it bigger to keep the peace.
Even if you can enforce your will and leave out a family member who expected to be included, consider the effect your stubbornness will have on family harmony. "If you deliberately leave out someone your parents or in-laws want included, you may be making a bigger statement than you intended," notes Claro. Their conspicuous absence is a visible declaration of your rejection. When it comes down to it, would including this person really ruin your wedding day? Or will the repercussions of leaving her out sully family relationships for years to come?

Wedding party selection can be a total beast what with all the DIY and destination weddings and mixed families. 
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Tuesday, February 23, 2016

Engagement Party Planning 101

ou've got the dress sorted, now it's time to think about wedding beauty. We've put together these 20 bridal make-up tips, with a little help from the experts, to make sure you look flawless on your big day.
image: http://marieclaire.media.ipcdigital.co.uk/11116/00008135c/e13d_orh1000w646/Bridal-makup-L.jpg
image: http://marieclaire.media.ipcdigital.co.uk/11116/00008135c/e13d_orh1000w646/Bridal-makup-L.jpg
  


Simply say 'I do' to the following bridal make-up rules and prepare to wow.

Do:


1. 'Make sure you have your trial at least three weeks, but no more than 5 weeks, before your wedding. If you plan on using fake tan for the big day, have a test run before your make-up trial so that your artist can see what colour your skin becomes with the tan,' says M·A·C Senior Artist, Rebecca Butterworth.

2. 'Wear a white t-shirt if you’re having your make-up test in a store so that you can see how the make-up looks against a pale colour and take a picture of yourself in day light (with no flash) to see how it looks before you purchase anything,' says celebrity make-up maestro Caroline Barnes.
3. 'Emphasize your eyes by brightening any darkness under them with corrector and concealer,' says Bobbi Brown.
4.' Bring references to your make-up trial. Start looking for images of make-up that you really like and bring them with you on the day. Try to identify what it is you like about the make-up in the image and take into account that if you have the skin colour of Dita Von Teese then the make-up of Kim Kardashian won't necessarily translate onto you,' says Rebecca from M·A·C.

5. 'Remember that bridal make-up needs to have enough colour to compensate for the whiteness of the dress. There’s a big difference between everyday clothes and a wedding dress, so there should be difference in your make-up, too. Start by making sure your skin looks even and smooth, and then add colour to your cheeks and lips to give them a glow,' says Bobbi Brown.
6. 'Use individual eyelashes – they’re a brilliant way to make your eyes stand out and look far more subtle than a full strip. Go for differing lengths to create a really natural fluttery look and nestle them in between your natural lashes rather than fixing them on top,' says Rebecca.
7. 'Focus on the most important elements of your look, such as beautifully natural-looking skin, softly groomed brows and feathery lashes. If you get these basic factors right the rest of your make-up will fall into place,' says Caroline Barnes.
8. 'Research application methods as they might differ slightly from your everyday make-up routine. For example, if you prefer to line with a shadow, make it last longer by applying it with a slightly damp eyeliner brush,' says Bobbi.
9.' Go pro. The best wedding make-up should last as long as you do so I love M·A·C’s Prolongwear range which includes foundations, concealers, lip and eye products that provide superior wear that will see you through your wedding day and night,' says Rebecca.

10. 'Finish your make-up off with a highlighter shade on the browbone to make the eyes really pop. Go for a light matte shade, and pat onto the outer corner of the brow bone so subtly draw attention to this area of your face,' says Bobbi.
image: http://marieclaire.media.ipcdigital.co.uk/11116/0000782b9/a2ca_orh1000w646/Bridal-make-up-tips-L.jpg
image: http://marieclaire.media.ipcdigital.co.uk/11116/0000782b9/a2ca_orh1000w646/Bridal-make-up-tips-L.jpg
  


Don't: 

1. 'Have your make-up test done anywhere with overhead fluorescent lighting. If you have a professional make-up artist coming to your home, arrange a time when it’s still daylight outside,' says Caroline Barnes.
2. 'Let a make-up artist hijack your look. For a lot of people, their wedding is a time when they can really take pleasure in having someone else do their make-up, but I think there can be a temptation to just indulge in the experience and take on all sorts of suggestions from the make-up artist - someone who may not know you or how you like to look particularly well. I'd advise real caution here; you don't want to surprise your intended at the altar by turning up looking like someone else. Whether you're hiring a make-up artist or doing your own, I generally think that the best bridal make-up is simply the most exquisitely polished version of how the bride usually looks - after all, you want to look beautiful rather than your make-up,” says make-up artist and Lancome UK Make-up Artist Ambassador, Alex Babsky.
3. 'Trowel it on. It’s a total myth that your make-up has to be plastered on for the photographs. Lots of wedding photography is done in natural light, and if you choose a heavy base the make-up will look obvious. In terms of flash, you just need to ensure that your T Zone is matte and that can be achieved with fine translucent powders and blotting powders, not layers of make-up,' says Caroline.
4. 'Go for anything too trend-led. It's worth bearing in mind that you'll have to live with photos from your wedding for the rest of your life, so it's best to avoid statement looks and opt for something more classic; that glittery eyeliner you saw on a Parisian catwalk might look super pretty and modern now, but chances are it'll look tired and dated in twenty years' time. This isn't to say that you'll have to make yourself up in a symphony of beiges though if you're used to a more punchy make-up - vintage wedding dresses in particular can look breathtaking with a classic old Hollywood lipstick colour,' says Alex Babsky.

How to plan a wedding: your 12-month guide
5. 'Be scared of going a bit brighter. Neutral, brown, and pale lip colours can look washed out in photographs, so choose a lipstick that’s one or two shades brighter than what you would normally wear. If you usually wear a neutral hue, it should be worn as a base, with a pink or rose colour on top. If you typically wear dark lipstick, use that as the base, and apply a brighter pink on top to give the colour a lift. Pinks, roses and plums are all great, classic choices for brides,' says Bobbi.

6. 'Just apply make-up to your face. Instead, extend down your neck and over your shoulders if necessary, this will ensure you face is not a different colour or even texture to your body. Everything should look uniform to create the most natural look possible. An easy way to blend uneven skin tones together is to use a light fake tan. Do this the day before your wedding not the night and beware of darkening your skin tone too much as the effect it actually the deaden the look of your complexion,' says Caroline.
7. 'Forget to decide what kind of maintenance you’d prefer for the day. For example, are you happy to check you're looking okay throughout the day, or do you want to just forget about your make-up once it's on? Waterproof mascara is an obvious requisite, but it's also worth considering cream eyeshadows that really set - you can be sure they'll stay where you put them,' says Alex.

8. 'Go too dark on the eyes. Define your eyes by applying colour in the crease, but avoid using a shade that’s too dense, as it can detract from the eyes themselves,' says Bobbi.

9. 'Go too glossy or too matte. It's best to avoid lipsticks at either end of the texture scale; too glossy and they'll only last five minutes whilst too matte and they may leave your lips dry and cakey by the time it's the moment to kiss your groom. A moisturising, satin-y finish lipstick is best for a wedding - this kind of formula will keep your lips looking their best and will wear off the most evenly and naturally; several thin layers, blotted between applications will give the most long-lasting finish,' says Alex.
10. 'Rush. Allow at least 45 minutes to an hour for make-up application on the wedding day,' says Bobbi.

Read more at http://www.marieclaire.co.uk/blogs/cassie-steer/544615/bridal-make-up-tips-the-10-dos-and-don-ts-you-need-to-pay-attention-to.html#vJd6ThlvpcfuZtU6.99
You've got the dress sorted, now it's time to think about wedding beauty. We've put together these 20 bridal make-up tips, with a little help from the experts, to make sure you look flawless on your big day.
image: http://marieclaire.media.ipcdigital.co.uk/11116/00008135c/e13d_orh1000w646/Bridal-makup-L.jpg
image: http://marieclaire.media.ipcdigital.co.uk/11116/00008135c/e13d_orh1000w646/Bridal-makup-L.jpg
  


Simply say 'I do' to the following bridal make-up rules and prepare to wow.

Do:


1. 'Make sure you have your trial at least three weeks, but no more than 5 weeks, before your wedding. If you plan on using fake tan for the big day, have a test run before your make-up trial so that your artist can see what colour your skin becomes with the tan,' says M·A·C Senior Artist, Rebecca Butterworth.

2. 'Wear a white t-shirt if you’re having your make-up test in a store so that you can see how the make-up looks against a pale colour and take a picture of yourself in day light (with no flash) to see how it looks before you purchase anything,' says celebrity make-up maestro Caroline Barnes.
3. 'Emphasize your eyes by brightening any darkness under them with corrector and concealer,' says Bobbi Brown.
4.' Bring references to your make-up trial. Start looking for images of make-up that you really like and bring them with you on the day. Try to identify what it is you like about the make-up in the image and take into account that if you have the skin colour of Dita Von Teese then the make-up of Kim Kardashian won't necessarily translate onto you,' says Rebecca from M·A·C.

5. 'Remember that bridal make-up needs to have enough colour to compensate for the whiteness of the dress. There’s a big difference between everyday clothes and a wedding dress, so there should be difference in your make-up, too. Start by making sure your skin looks even and smooth, and then add colour to your cheeks and lips to give them a glow,' says Bobbi Brown.
6. 'Use individual eyelashes – they’re a brilliant way to make your eyes stand out and look far more subtle than a full strip. Go for differing lengths to create a really natural fluttery look and nestle them in between your natural lashes rather than fixing them on top,' says Rebecca.
7. 'Focus on the most important elements of your look, such as beautifully natural-looking skin, softly groomed brows and feathery lashes. If you get these basic factors right the rest of your make-up will fall into place,' says Caroline Barnes.
8. 'Research application methods as they might differ slightly from your everyday make-up routine. For example, if you prefer to line with a shadow, make it last longer by applying it with a slightly damp eyeliner brush,' says Bobbi.
9.' Go pro. The best wedding make-up should last as long as you do so I love M·A·C’s Prolongwear range which includes foundations, concealers, lip and eye products that provide superior wear that will see you through your wedding day and night,' says Rebecca.

10. 'Finish your make-up off with a highlighter shade on the browbone to make the eyes really pop. Go for a light matte shade, and pat onto the outer corner of the brow bone so subtly draw attention to this area of your face,' says Bobbi.
image: http://marieclaire.media.ipcdigital.co.uk/11116/0000782b9/a2ca_orh1000w646/Bridal-make-up-tips-L.jpg
image: http://marieclaire.media.ipcdigital.co.uk/11116/0000782b9/a2ca_orh1000w646/Bridal-make-up-tips-L.jpg
  


Don't: 

1. 'Have your make-up test done anywhere with overhead fluorescent lighting. If you have a professional make-up artist coming to your home, arrange a time when it’s still daylight outside,' says Caroline Barnes.
2. 'Let a make-up artist hijack your look. For a lot of people, their wedding is a time when they can really take pleasure in having someone else do their make-up, but I think there can be a temptation to just indulge in the experience and take on all sorts of suggestions from the make-up artist - someone who may not know you or how you like to look particularly well. I'd advise real caution here; you don't want to surprise your intended at the altar by turning up looking like someone else. Whether you're hiring a make-up artist or doing your own, I generally think that the best bridal make-up is simply the most exquisitely polished version of how the bride usually looks - after all, you want to look beautiful rather than your make-up,” says make-up artist and Lancome UK Make-up Artist Ambassador, Alex Babsky.
3. 'Trowel it on. It’s a total myth that your make-up has to be plastered on for the photographs. Lots of wedding photography is done in natural light, and if you choose a heavy base the make-up will look obvious. In terms of flash, you just need to ensure that your T Zone is matte and that can be achieved with fine translucent powders and blotting powders, not layers of make-up,' says Caroline.
4. 'Go for anything too trend-led. It's worth bearing in mind that you'll have to live with photos from your wedding for the rest of your life, so it's best to avoid statement looks and opt for something more classic; that glittery eyeliner you saw on a Parisian catwalk might look super pretty and modern now, but chances are it'll look tired and dated in twenty years' time. This isn't to say that you'll have to make yourself up in a symphony of beiges though if you're used to a more punchy make-up - vintage wedding dresses in particular can look breathtaking with a classic old Hollywood lipstick colour,' says Alex Babsky.

How to plan a wedding: your 12-month guide
5. 'Be scared of going a bit brighter. Neutral, brown, and pale lip colours can look washed out in photographs, so choose a lipstick that’s one or two shades brighter than what you would normally wear. If you usually wear a neutral hue, it should be worn as a base, with a pink or rose colour on top. If you typically wear dark lipstick, use that as the base, and apply a brighter pink on top to give the colour a lift. Pinks, roses and plums are all great, classic choices for brides,' says Bobbi.

6. 'Just apply make-up to your face. Instead, extend down your neck and over your shoulders if necessary, this will ensure you face is not a different colour or even texture to your body. Everything should look uniform to create the most natural look possible. An easy way to blend uneven skin tones together is to use a light fake tan. Do this the day before your wedding not the night and beware of darkening your skin tone too much as the effect it actually the deaden the look of your complexion,' says Caroline.
7. 'Forget to decide what kind of maintenance you’d prefer for the day. For example, are you happy to check you're looking okay throughout the day, or do you want to just forget about your make-up once it's on? Waterproof mascara is an obvious requisite, but it's also worth considering cream eyeshadows that really set - you can be sure they'll stay where you put them,' says Alex.

8. 'Go too dark on the eyes. Define your eyes by applying colour in the crease, but avoid using a shade that’s too dense, as it can detract from the eyes themselves,' says Bobbi.

9. 'Go too glossy or too matte. It's best to avoid lipsticks at either end of the texture scale; too glossy and they'll only last five minutes whilst too matte and they may leave your lips dry and cakey by the time it's the moment to kiss your groom. A moisturising, satin-y finish lipstick is best for a wedding - this kind of formula will keep your lips looking their best and will wear off the most evenly and naturally; several thin layers, blotted between applications will give the most long-lasting finish,' says Alex.
10. 'Rush. Allow at least 45 minutes to an hour for make-up application on the wedding day,' says Bobbi.

Read more at http://www.marieclaire.co.uk/blogs/cassie-steer/544615/bridal-make-up-tips-the-10-dos-and-don-ts-you-need-to-pay-attention-to.html#vJd6ThlvpcfuZtU6.99


You don't need an excuse for a celebratory bash—you're engaged! Party on with our engagement party primer.
Party guests at dinner table with wine glasses
PHOTO BY A SIMPLE PHOTOGRAPHY
The purpose of an engagement party—usually scheduled no later than three months after the big announcement—can be threefold: to share the news of your imminent union with future wedding guests, to introduce your families to each other, and to celebrate the impending, well, celebration. Tradition has it that the bride's parents host the initial gathering, but the groom's parents can then throw their own party, or both sets can come together to host the fete. As you decide, here are five things the hosts should keep in mind:

1. Your Family Should Give You Time to Breathe

An impromptu family gathering the weekend after your partner proposed is the perfect opportunity to break out the vintage champagne, but don't schedule an all-out opulent affair during the first month of your engagement. You both need some time to revel in just being engaged. Plan to have an engagement party two to four months after the question was popped. That gives you the chance to envision your eventual wedding—a crucial element to consider when deciding on the type of event to throw.

2. Find Out the Size of Your Wedding

Everyone who's invited to the engagement party should ultimately be invited to the wedding. Otherwise, guests might wonder what they did at the engagement party to insult you! That said, if you decide to host your own wedding and keep the list small and you want to throw an extravagant engagement party, go for it. Just be sure to let people know that the wedding will be small so no feelings will be hurt when guests aren't invited to the wedding. If you're worried that your friends will think you want to have a big bash solely to garner gifts, include a nice note in the invitation that requests no presents.

3. Consider What Will Make the In-Laws Most Comfortable

Since the engagement party custom was actually designed to help you start building bridges between your families, consider their style. If one of you has a very formal family, an impromptu picnic in the park might not be the most appropriate setting for getting to know one another. Likewise, a five-course sit-down dinner attended by all your friends might be a bit intimidating for them. Settle nerves by including as many people from their side as you can reasonably accommodate.

4. Register for Gifts Beforehand

While guests have not brought presents to this function traditionally, increasing numbers do today, so it's only fair to provide guidance. Register for gifts in the low to middle range—a $500 cappuccino maker is not your typical engagement present. If some guests arrive bearing gifts, just be sure you unwrap them after the party or away from the crowd, so people who came empty-handed won't feel uncomfortable.

5. Remind Yourself That There's Still a Wedding to Throw

Every host wants to plan an unforgettable affair, but you never want to upstage the main event. Try to create a different mood for the engagement party while maintaining your own style. You won't want to force a casual cookout if you (and your guests) favor formal parties, and vice versa. But if your guests are up to it, set apart a black-tie affair with a sit-on-the-floor, buffet-style engagement bash; preview a semiformal daytime wedding with a swanky cocktail party, ties optional; or balance a destination wedding with a home-cooked dinner party.


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